I have a friend who refuses to be recognized for all that she does. She says “we are all just penciled in.” I appreciate her philosophy, but I have a different belief. If someone has thought about you enough to recognize you, then let them express what they believe. Let them thank you, or congratulate you. There’s enough sad and difficult moments in life, why not have others share in something good? So to the good people at Compliance Week, thank you for this.

finalists lifetime achievement.png

 

 

Joe and Emil Moschella, have written a post for NYU urging governments to use compliance and ethics programs as a tool to address issues with police departments.  Emil is Executive Director and Joe is chair of the Rutgers Center for Government Compliance and Ethics.

Corporate Compliance Approach to Racism and Excessive Force Issues in Police Departments

https://wp.nyu.edu/compliance_enforcement/2020/08/03/corporate-compliance-approach-to-racism-and-excessive-force-issues-in-police-departments/

 

Joe was a chapter author and a member of the editorial board in the just released ABA book, THE ANTITRUST COMPLIANCE HANDBOOK: A PRACTITIONER’S GUIDE (ABA Section of Antitrust Law; 2019).  Joe has written and spoken extensively on the subject of antirust compliance.

 

Joe speaks up about harassment in the workplace

On March 15, 2019, in In the News, by Joe Murphy
Joe’s comments on the SCCE’s Blog on whether the Chief Justice and the US Supreme Court are serious about stopping harassment. Shouldn’t leadership actually lead, instead of just telling others what to do?

http://complianceandethics.org/gee-do-we-really-need-the-leaders-to-set-an-example-the-chief-justice-isnt-sure/

 

 

Joe Murphy has been recognized in Trust!, The Magazine of Trust Across America – Trust Around the World as Trust Across America 2019 Top Thought Leader in Trust.

For 40 years, Joe has been a tire-less champion of compliance and ethics in organizations, published over 100 articles and given over 200 presentations in 17 countries. Joe travels the world helping compliance and ethics professionals steer their companies and other organizations along the straight and narrow path.

 

Joe has posted a detailed draft analysis of ISO 37001 on the Social Science Research Network. Is this the new standard for anti-corruption compliance programs, or still a work in progress? Will it help improve compliance programs, or cause companies to make mistakes, or maybe do both? What do you think of this standard? Should companies be applying this today? https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3315737

 

ISO 37001 on anti-corruption compliance management systems has been unusually controversial. Joe proposes starting a discussion on the FCPA blog on how to fix ISO 37001 and the certification process:  https://tinyurl.com/y8payzch 

 

Joe Murphy named a “Top Thought Leader”

On October 30, 2018, in In the News, by Joe Murphy

I just learned that earlier this year I was selected as a Top Thought Leader by Trust Across America – Trust Around the World.  Thank you for this honor.  https://www.trustacrossamerica.com/documents/magazine/Trust-Magazine-2018-winter.pdf

 

 

Professor Paul McGreal and Joe Murphy have pointed out that even though New York City has enacted what has been described as “the nation’s furthest-reaching anti-sexual harassment laws,” it is questionable how serious an effort this really is. In other compliance areas, where companies want to prevent misconduct, there is much more that is expected of them. Only in the area of harassment are they simply asked to do paper and preaching, tell people to call HR, investigate if anyone does call, and not much more.

We may be saying “me too,” but if we were serious about it we would be doing much more.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-york-city-gets-tough-preventing-harassment-does-paul-mcgreal/

 

On behalf of SCCE, Joe Murphy has filed comments with the Department of Justice’s Deputy Assistant Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein.  In his speech of October 6, 2017 DAG Rosenstein invited comments on the Department of Justice’s enforcement policies. Among other points,  the filing challenges the inconsistent approaches taken to compliance programs, and particularly the Antitrust Division’s odd policy of only rewarding companies that refrain from implementing compliance programs until they are caught after a violation. This one unit refuses to consider preventive compliance programs, in conflict with the rest of the Department of Justice.  This creates an unfair environment where those outside the Department do not know whether or not compliance programs actually count in dealing with the Department.

Letter-to-Deputy-A- R-Rosenstein